What Is TMS And How The Society Treat It?

Treatment of psychological conditions is more often than not much more complex than treating regular, physical conditions, illnesses and injuries. There are several reasons to this: to begin with, the field of psychology is still poorly understood when it comes to the specifics – what is available at present is a broad understanding at best. And then, most of the treatments that have been invented for most disorders and conditions do not work for everyone. Psychology is basically held back by the fact that every individual is different – how disorders afflict each person varies, what each person feels varies, and what treatment works best also varies.This fact has led to a general lack of success when it comes to researching successful treatments for psychological conditions. Whenever a line of study shows promise, most medical associations and good psychiatrists are often not too enthusiastic to pick up on it due to this reason – and it is often not too long before a follow-up study shows the lack of efficacy of the treatment on other people (and not to add, these studies take more than a few years – hence why progress has been slow). 

One such treatment that has been successful for a number of candidates, but received official approval in the medical world only recently is transcranial magnetic stimulation Sydney. The procedure, in fact, dates back to the early years of the 1980’s, but it was approved as a form of treatment only back in 2008. It is often shortened to TMS, and an ‘r’ (which stands for ‘repetitive’) is added due to it being not a one-time procedure, but a repetitive one (i.e. rTMS). TMS features the placing of an electromagnetic coil (which is connected to a generator that generates electricity) over the head of the patient. When electricity is passed through the coil, it sends magnetic impulses to the brain. These magnetic impulses are supposed to stimulate the region of the brain that regulates emotions and moods – the prefrontal cortex (found right above the eyes). The procedure is harmless, and the patient is perfectly capable of attending sessions by himself or herself (i.e. there is no need for anyone to accompany the patient). Often, TMS treatment is an ongoing treatment of multiple sessions for around six weeks – but in certain cases, the treatment can last anywhere from four to seven weeks. TMS is often named as a treatment procedure for the more resistant types of depression, but research has shown it being capable of making a difference in other conditions as well: for example, TMS can also be used as a treatment for neuropathic pain, and to yet an undocumented extent, schizophrenia.